Facial recognition needn’t infringe our privacy as the CCTV commissioner fears. Quite the opposite – if we get the tech right

James Wickes

Founder, Cloudview

Author Bio ▼

James is a co-founder of Cloudview, which leads the way in cloud-based video surveillance with a secure, scalable, user-friendly and affordable platform that can be managed and accessed from a browser using a notebook, tablet or Smartphone from anywhere in the world.
November 1, 2017

Sign up to free email newsletters

Download

The State of Surveillance Storage – The Seagate Surveillance Storage Survey Report 2018

Surveillance Camera Commissioner Tony Porter has written to police chiefs warning that use of facial recognition technology poses a grave risk to our privacy – and threatens to undermine public trust in the police.

But facial recognition could ultimately give the public more, not less, confidence in law enforcement. This advanced technology forms part of a new era of artificial intelligence (AI), a whole different world that could accelerate our understanding of people’s behaviour and, crucially, identify criminals quicker than ever before.

But, as a famous Hollywood philosopher once said: “With prodigious potential, comes prodigious risk”. AI is always going to run faster than the law can keep up with. It brings both morality and practicality issues into play, and it’s something that’s unavoidable.

The police can blank out and ignore innocent people on the one hand, and focus on people that pose a real risk on the other

Whether we like it or not, we are about to enter a new revolution that will have a more profound impact than the industrial revolution. So rather than pointing at the legal implications all the time, we should be exploring ways to make AI work for everyone.

We should look at facial recognition and AI in general as a route to improving privacy rather than reducing it, while at the same time enhancing the effectiveness of such systems. It’s quite possible to achieve both.

The police can blank out and ignore innocent people on the one hand, and focus on people that pose a real risk on the other – therefore improving public confidence.

Granted, the technology is not perfect today, but it is getting there – fast – and it needs the support and direction of people like Tony Porter. It’s wrong to berate the police for using facial recognition technology when it ultimately points the way to a more effective and less intrusive way to fight crime and terrorism.

Get hands on with new innovations in Video Surveillance this June.

At IFSEC International 2018 you'll be able to speak first hand with hundreds of leading video surveillance suppliers, including Hikvision, Hanwha Techwin, Samsung, and Panasonic, and view their latest innovations in action throughout the show floor.

Whether you're looking for a small CCTV, or a cloud-hosted multi-site surveillance solution that's fully integrated with your intruder detection and access control systems, you'll find it all under one roof for THREE days only.

Related Topics

Leave a Reply

1 Comment on "Facial recognition needn’t infringe our privacy as the CCTV commissioner fears. Quite the opposite – if we get the tech right"

avatar
  Subscribe  
newest oldest most voted
Notify of
Alastair
Guest

“The police can blank out and ignore innocent people on the one hand, and focus on people that pose a real risk on the other – therefore improving public confidence.”

I really don’t understand what this means. Can someone explain how an algorithm might be applied in practice.It sounds like stop and search to me. Best of intentions and poorly targeted. Unless the police can demonstrate legitimacy, proportionality and some transparency then who knows what AFR means for privacy or for security.