Adam Bannister

Editor, IFSEC Global

Author Bio ▼

Adam Bannister is editor of IFSEC Global. A former managing editor at Dynamis Online Media Group, he has been at the helm of the UK's leading fire and security publication since 2014.
September 20, 2017

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DATA PROTECTION

GDPR gives CCTV operators chance to “tackle negative image head-on”, says white paper

A white paper exploring the implications for CCTV of the forthcoming GDPR has been published by cloud-based surveillance company Cloudview.

The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) comes into force across the EU – including the UK – from 25 May 2018.

The upper limit of possible penalties has been raised considerably: organisations found in breach of the law could be fined amounts up to 79 times greater than those levied under the existing data protection regime.

“When installing a new system or upgrading an old system, any CCTV user or service provider will be expected to identify security risks and how those risks are to be addressed.” Excerpt from Watching the Watchers

Watching the Watchers: CCTV, the GDPR and the third wave of Data Privacy Regulation charts the history of data protection law, examines the changes introduced by the GDPR, identifies a shift “from compliance to accountability”, offers advice to CCTV operators and asks whether the new law might present an opportunity as well as a legal and administrative burden.

Indeed, the white paper’s introduction offers a positive take on a law that is causing great anxiety for organisations in most sectors: “The CCTV industry has, almost from its inception, been portrayed in popular culture as the unofficial face of unaccountable surveillance overreach and invasion of privacy,” it says. “This position has been cemented by a popular perception of a lack of transparency and public engagement on the part of its users.

“More recently, it has become the unwilling poster child for the hazards of engaging with the Internet of Things. The General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) thus provides a welcome opportunity for the CCTV industry and its users to tackle this negative image head-on.”

The paper has been written by Andrew Charlesworth, a reader in IT and Law and director of the Centre for IT and Law at the University of Bristol (CITL).

Cloudview which commissioned the report, provides a service that mobilises cloud computing and IoT technology to centralise and store visual data from CCTV systems, meaning the data can be analysed like any other form of big data.

Connected to analogue or IP cameras, Cloudview encrypts and transports visual data to “secure, resilient” cloud servers. Once stored, it can be instantly accessed, used and managed from anywhere on any device.

You can download the white paper here.

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